This morning I ran through an upgrade of our CRM; nothing to out the usual and something that I’ve done many times before. The update processed and then imploded, I was left with a white screen and a list of useless error codes suggesting something important for composer was broken and/or missing. I decided to speed things up, I’d pull down one of last night’s backups, it was only 7:30am so nobody was going to miss CRM for 30 minutes and so I pulled down the backup and deployed the server…

This is not an unusual scenario but backing up is still something that many people, let alone IT departments still forget to do. Think about your home photos for instance, if you lost your phone would you have a copy of them? Backing up is so easy to do these days with Apple, Google and Samsung (other phone manufactures are available) have built in solutions for automatic backup. It’s often the things that we don’t normally think about that we forget to backup, things like that useful script you use once a year, when it’s gone you will really miss it and because you probably didn’t document it you don’t remember how it worked when it comes to rewriting it. There is a worst sin than just forgetting to back up…

…I opened the newly recovered server backup and my jaw hit the floor and panic set in. August. The date of the backup was a date in August. We’re at the end of September. Fortunately, I had copies of everything on a development environment and within five minutes I’d updated the CRM and recovered all of my customisations, but it was a lesson well learnt…

That sin is not testing backups. When was the last time you did that? How do you know that your backups are correct? Testing a backup should (and is for me now) a mandatory step of backing up. If you don’t have a tested backup you don’t really have a backup. Heed these words, backup day, test as regularly as you can afford to lose data.


Loading Conversation